A status yellow – low temperature warning has been issued for Cork

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See our Top Tips for winter driving conditions.

Met Éireann have issued a status yellow – low temperature warning for Cork, which is valid from Saturday 18/01/2020 to 11:00 Sunday 19/01/2020.

  • Forecasters are warning that temperatures will fall to minus 3 or minus 4 degrees tonight, coldest around dawn and staying below freezing until mid-morning on Sunday.

Issued/Updated: 11:00 Saturday 18/01/2020
Valid: 21:00 Saturday 18/01/2020 to 11:00 Sunday 19/01/2020


 

Precautionary gritting starting at 18:00 tonight, and a second treatment at 02:00 as very low temperatures are expected overnight. Further monitoring of road conditions during the night.

Routes: The South Ring Road N40 as far as Ovens bridge, M8 as far as the toll plaza, the N25 as far as Junction 6 (Whitegate,) the N20 starting at The Commons Inn as far as the Killarney roundabout, the N71 as far as the end of the dual carriageway, all routes start at the Dunkettle Interchange.

Information provided to us by Egis Lagan Services. Motorway Maintenance. These are only the roads maintained by Egis Lagan, other roads may be gritted by the relevant local authorities.




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Our Top Tips for Winter Driving Conditions

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Our top tips for winter driving conditions!

We’ve compiled a list of top tips to help you in the cold, wintry weather.

  • Never start your vehicles engine and then leave the vehicle unattended. This increases your risk of theft to your vehicle.
  • Prepare for your journey in advance, and expect to leave early. Allow an extra 30 minutes for your journey.
  • Use de-icer / ice scraper to clear ice from windscreens and wing mirrors. Never use warm or boiling water to de-ice your vehicle, this may cause the windscreen to crack or shatter. Water on the ground may freeze, causing it to be a hazard to pedestrians.
  • Check your tyres and the thread depth. There is a minimum legal limit in Ireland, and that is 1.6mm. Ensuring your tyres are in good condition, and inflated to the correct tyre pressure.
  • Change summer tyres to winter tyres.
  • Anticipate “Black Ice” – which is a hazard due to the fact that its pretty much invisible, and difficult to spot. Black Ice is prominent on roads which may be sheltered by tree’s or in an area without a large traffic flow.
  • Never try put down electric windows when frozen, you could cause more damage than good.
  • To help with rubber door seals use a rubber conditioner to stop doors from sticking. Available from all good motoring stores.
  • If possible cover the car with a tarp and pull it off in the morning.
  • Turn off auto lights, wipers, heaters and radio when parking your car overnight so in the morning when starting the engine it will take the extra load off the battery. Don’t forget your vehicle uses alot more battery power in the winter than summer.
  • Check all lights are working on your vehicle. Only use fog lights in dense fog or falling snow. Improper use of fog lights is also a motoring offence.
  • Have a high visibility vest, torch, extra jacket, blanket, spare tyre and drinking water in case of a breakdown. Check you have breakdown cover with your insurance company, don’t wait until you break down. Remember a flat tyre is considered a breakdown. 
  • Avoid journeys if possible, but if you have to travel always have a fully charged mobile phone, and always tell someone of your planned journey and let them know when you arrive.

This list is not exhaustive, and there are many other tips that can be provided. Please feel free to send us your suggestions.

Have you checked out our Vehicle Maintenance article




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HSE: Teaching kids to prevent the spread of infectious diseases

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HSE teaching kids to prevent the spread of infectious diseases

To help improve respiratory hygiene in schools and crèches, the HSE’s Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) has developed eye-catching new posters which have been distributed to all schools as part of a resource pack.

Teaching children to sneeze and cough into their arm or elbow is critical to improving respiratory hygiene and in reducing the spread of infection. Having access to tissues is also important so we can teach children to ‘catch it, bin it, kill it.’

Bacteria and viruses from hundreds of homes meet at crèches, schools and day-care centres every day. It is a fact that the ten best things to spread bugs amongst children are the ten fingers on their hands.

Young children are at increased risk for contracting infectious diseases because they:

  • tend to sneeze and cough into their hands
  • are grouped together and are exposed to many new germs
  • have immune systems that are not fully developed to fight germs
  • have personal habits that spread germs such as thumb sucking, rubbing eyes and putting things in their mouths.

The posters have versions for primary schools and secondary schools and both are also available in Irish and English. They are aimed at assisting teachers and crèches to teach some of the key respiratory hygiene messages. We also have an extremely useful online resource for teachers and parents www.e-bug.eu/. e-Bug is a free educational resource for classroom and home use. It enables fun and accessible learning for all students around micro-organisms, the spread, prevention and treatment of infection.

The school section of the website includes:

  • detailed lesson plans
  • fun student worksheets
  • extension activities
  • animations
  • activity demonstrations.

Dr John Cuddihy, Interim Director, HSE HPSC says: “It is so important that we do everything to protect children’s health. Teaching respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene will help stop infections in schools and home. Good respiratory and hand hygiene can help parents reduce the risk of having to stay home from work due to their child’s or their own illness. However if you are sick it is important to stay home from work or school. The HSE website Undertheweather.ie has lots of help and advice on managing simple illnesses at home.”

Martin Cormican, HSE National Lead for Infection Control adds: “As well as teaching children to cough and sneeze into the elbow or a tissue it’s important they know how to wash their hands. The Wash Wash your hands song (listed below) is just long enough to provide sufficient time to get the job done. So, instead of setting a time-frame that your child won’t understand, get them to sing their song and explain that when the song is finished they have washed their hands properly.”

There are lots of hand hygiene tips and videos on www.hse.ie/infectioncontrol.




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HSE say there has been an increase in cases of mumps notified to them in recent weeks

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There has been an increase in the number of cases of mumps notified to the Department of Public Health, HSE South in recent weeks.

This follows on from an notable increase in the number of cases reported in other regions of the country (a link is included below to the most recent available figures).

Most cases are teenagers and young adults, occurring among those aged 15-24 years of age. The highest numbers of cases are in those aged 18-19 years of age. In Cork and Kerry, we have noted that many of the cases are among young people attending third level institutions.

There are two important factors in preventing the spread of mumps while it is circulating:

  • a high level of age appropriate MMR vaccination
  • making sure anyone with mumps limits their contact with others while infectious

For that reason, the Department of Public Health, HSE South is recommending that:

  • Students and young adults should ensure they have had two doses of the MMR vaccine, available free of charge from the HSE. Anyone who is not sure if they have had both doses can safely receive an additional dose. You can see more information https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/whoweare/requestrecord.html on how to see your vaccination record.
  • Any person with mumps should limit their contact with others while infectious. A person with mumps and is advised not to attend work, school, college, university or child-care during their infectious period (i.e. for 5 days after onset of swelling)
  • Where possible, people should avoid contact with anyone who has mumps infection
  • Regular hand washing is always a good idea.

Dr Augustine Pereira, Director of Public Health, HSE South advised that vaccination with the MMR vaccine is the only way to protect against mumps, and added that the two scheduled doses of MMR are estimated to protect about 88% of individuals.

“We are therefore advising that all students and young adults (including young teachers) should ensure that they have had two doses of the MMR vaccine. The vaccine can be obtained free of charge from your GP or student health service. Everyone should avoid contact with someone who has mumps infection, and of course we urge everyone to continue with regular hand washing,” Dr Pereira said.

Anyone who suspects they have mumps should telephone their GP for advice before visiting.

And anyone who has a clinical diagnoses of mumps should limit their contact with others while infectious, and not attend work, school, college, university or child-care during their infectious period, which is for five days after the onset of swelling.

“We’d like to reiterate the key message that all children should be vaccinated with two doses of the MMR vaccine as part of the routine childhood immunisation programme,” Dr Pereira said.

What is Mumps?

Mumps is an acute viral disease. It is very infectious. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and loss of appetite followed by swelling of salivary (and sometimes other) glands.

How is mumps spread?

It is spread by direct contact with saliva or respiratory droplets from the mouth, nose, or throat, such as

  • coughing, sneezing, or talking
  • sharing items contaminated with saliva (water bottles or cups)
  • close-contact activities with others (playing sports, dancing, or kissing)
  • touching objects or surfaces contaminated with the virus

How long is someone infectious?

  • about 3 days before swelling of salivary glands to approximately 5 days after

How can we prevent the spread of mumps?

  • A person with mumps should limit their contact with others while infectious and is advised not to attend work, school, college, university or child-care during their infectious period (i.e. for 5 days after onset of parotid swelling) in view of the possibility of transmitting virus to non-immune individuals.
  • All students and young adults (including young teachers) should ensure that they have had two doses of MMR vaccine (measles mumps rubella vaccine). The vaccine can be obtained FREE OF CHARGE from their GP or student health service.
  • Avoid contact with someone who has mumps infection
  • Regular hand washing

What if I’m not sure if I’ve had two doses of the MMR?

The National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC) does not recommend a third dose of MMR for those who have documentary evidence of having already received two doses. However, an additional dose won’t cause any harm, so anyone unsure of whether they have had two doses or not can safely receive a dose of MMR vaccine.

Where can I get a copy of my vaccination records?

Follow this link for more information

https://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/whoweare/requestrecord.html




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Statement from Gardaí re. the murder of Cameron Blair on Bandon Road, Cork on 16th Jan 2020

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Image: Gerard McCarthy




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17/01/2010

Statement from Gardaí re. the murder of Cameron Blair on Bandon Road, Cork on 16th Jan 2020 

The post-mortem examination that took place this afternoon at Cork University Hospital has been completed. The results of the post-mortem are not being released for operational reasons.

Gardaí are again appealing for anyone who has any information to contact us. Anyone who was in the Bandon Road area between 8pm and 10pm who witnessed anything or anyone with dash cam or mobile phone footage is asked to contact Togher Garda Station on 021-494 7120, the Garda Confidential Line on 1800-666-111 or any Garda Station.

No arrests have been made and the investigation is ongoing.


 

A man in his 20s has died following a stabbing incident on the Bandon Road overnight.

At approximately 9.20 pm, Gardaí received a report of an assault in which a 20 year old man had received serious injuries. The man was brought to Cork University Hospital but was later pronounced dead.

Gardaí issued the following statement last night: “Gardaì are currently at the scene of an assault incident on Bandon Road, Cork. A man in his 20s has been brought to CUH with what is believed to be life threatening injuries. Witnesses are asked to contact Bridewell Station on 021- 4943330”

An incident room has been set up at Togher Gardaí station and a senior investigating officer has been appointed. CCTV is being gathered and door to door enquiries are commencing this morning.

The scene is currently preserved for a technical examination by the local Scenes of Crime unit. The local Coroner and the office of the State Pathologist has been informed. A post mortem is scheduled to take place today. The Bandon Road remains closed as a result.

Gardaí are appealing for anyone who has any information to contact us. Anyone who was in the Bandon Road area between 8pm and 10pm who witnessed anything or anyone with dash cam or mobile phone footage is asked to contact Togher Garda Station on 021-494 7120, the Garda Confidential Line on 1800-666-111 or any Garda Station.

Anyone who does have any details or video footage is asked to contact Gardaí and not to share it on social media.




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Gardai arrest a man in his 30s in relation to a burglary at a factory on the Mallow road this morning

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Gardaí have arrested a man in his 30s in relation to a burglary at a factory in Boland’s Industrial Estate, Mallow Road, Co. Cork on the 16th January, 2020.

Shortly after 4:30am, Gardaí received a report of an ongoing burglary. Gardaí from Watercourse Road and Gurranabraher attended the scene and carried out a patrol of the area.

Following a short foot chase, a man in his 30s was arrested and was found in possession of a jacket that had been stolen from the factory.

The man was brought to Mayfield Garda Station where he is currently detained under Section 4 of the Criminal Justice Act, 1984.




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ESB Networks are reminding groups and parties not to erect posters on ESB poles

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ESB Networks wish to remind all groups and parties involved in the upcoming General Election that the erection of posters on ESB electricity poles poses a serious safety risk to ESB Networks staff, contractors and members of the public and is strictly prohibited.

Dangerous situations have been created in the past by individuals or parties erecting posters on electricity poles. There is a very real danger to life when placing posters on live electricity poles. Posters have caused the pole to catch fire as well as creating blind spots for traffic.

ESB Networks has been required to interrupt the electricity supply to households and businesses in order to safely remove these dangerous posters. Posters that are erected on electricity poles will be removed by ESB Networks and the costs incurred may be recovered from the respective parties and groups involved.

ESB Networks regularly advise the general public to always stay clear of electricity poles and wires through its TV, radio and social media campaigns. It is important that these messages are taken on board in the interest of safety.

In the event of a dangerous situation or emergency, the public are reminded to immediately phone ESB Networks emergency service on 1850 372 999 (24 hour/7 day service).


Fógra Sábháilteachta do gach Grúpa agus Páirtí a bhfuil baint acu leis an t-Olltochán

Is mian le ESB Networks a mheabhrú do gach grúpa agus páirtí a bhfuil baint acu leis an t-Olltochán go bhfuil baol tromchúiseach ó thaobh sláinte d’fhoireann ESB Networks, do chonraitheoirí agus don phobal ag baint le póstaeir a chrochadh ar chuaillí leictreachais ESB agus tá cosc iomlán iad a chrochadh orthu.

Bhí contúirt mhór i gceist san am a caitheadh nuair a chuir daoine agus páirtithe suas póstaeir ar chuaillí leictreachais. Is contúirt dháiríre é póstaeir a chur ar chuaillí leictreachais bheo. Las cuaillí cheana mar gheall ar phóstaeir agus bíonn siad sa bhealach ar thiománaithe.

B’éigean do ESB Networks cur isteach ar an soláthar leictreachais chuig tithe agus gnónna chun na póstaeir chontúirteacha seo a bhaint anuas.

Bainfidh ESB Networks anuas aon phóstaeir a chuirfear ar chuaillí leictreachais agus rachfar chuig na páirtithe agus grúpaí ag iarraidh na gcostas a bhaineann leis sin a aisghabháil.

Iarrann ESB Networks i bhfeachtais teilifíse, raidió agus meán sóisialta ar an bpobal fanacht glan ar chuaillí agus sreanga leictreachais. Tá sé tábhachtach aird a thabhairt ar na teachtaireachtaí seo ar mhaithe le sábháilteacht.

I gcás éigeandála nó staid dhainséarach, iarrtar ar an bpobal glaoch láithreach ar sheirbhís éigeandála ESB Networks ag an uimhir 1850 372 999 (seirbhís 24 uair/7 lá).




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A status yellow wind warning has been issued for Cork valid from 02:00 Thursday 16/01/2020 to 14:00 Thursday 16/01/2020

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Met Éireann have issued a status yellow – wind warning for Cork, which is valid from 02:00 Thursday 16/01/2020 to 14:00 Thursday 16/01/2020

  • Forecasters are warning that South to Southeast winds 50 to 65 km/hr gusts 90 to 110 km/hr, strongest on coasts and hills. Risk of coastal flooding around period of high tides..

Issued/Updated: 10:00 Wednesday 15/01/2020
Valid: 02:00 Thursday 16/01/2020 to 14:00 Thursday 16/01/2020




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Gardaí appeal for witnesses following the arrest of a juvenile in Blackpool this afternoon

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Image: @DonalHunt via Twitter




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Gardaí have arrested a juvenile in his mid-teens in relation to a number of traffic collisions in the Blackpool area.

The car he was driving, which is believed to have been stolen this morning from the Shandon Street area of Cork city, was involved in a number of road traffic collisions in the Blackpool area shortly before 12 midday.

A woman received non-life threaten injuries as a result of one of the collisions and has been brought to Cork University Hospital.

A juvenile was arrested following the collisions and is currently detained at Mayfield Garda Station under Section 4 of the Criminal Justice Act, 1984.

Gardaí are appealing for witnesses or anyone who may have camera footage of the incident to contact them. If anyone in the area notices any damage caused to their vehicle that they believe was caused as a result of this incident they are asked to contact Watercourse Road Garda Station on 021-4558260.




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HSE is reminding people who wish to reduce their alcohol intake that support is available

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Struggling with your New Year’s Resolution to reduce your alcohol intake?

HSE offers advice to stay motivated and ditch the hangovers

Visit www.AskAboutAlcohol.ie for more advice and tools

HSE Alcohol & Drugs Helpline 1800 459 459


The HSE is today (Tuesday, 14th January) reminding people who wish to reduce their alcohol intake that advice and support is available. January is traditionally a time for New Year’s goals or resolutions. Cutting back on alcohol is a resolution for many people in 2020 however, as January progresses many people may find it hard to maintain their motivation. Change is possible and the HSE can support you.

Marion Rackard, Project Manager for the HSE Alcohol Programme says ‘Deciding to drink less is a great resolution however, if you find yourself struggling to maintain your motivation it’s a good idea to think about why you want to change the way you drink. You might have niggling concerns about increased weight gain, lack of energy or even how you have behaved during a drinking occasion or two and wonder how others see you especially those who matter most to you. You might want to consider certain questions like: How do I see myself as a drinker? How do others see me? Have I asked them? Have there been any negative effects because of my drinking over the last year? What are the potential benefits of making a change and drinking less this year? Have I used the Ask About Alcohol Self Assessment Tool and what message is it giving me? The way to make a lasting change around how much you drink starts with thinking about it and deciding what you want to do.’

Research shows that over 50% of people in Ireland who drink, drink in a way that could be causing harm so it’s not surprising that lots of people have some worries or nagging doubts about their drinking and wonder if it would be a good idea to change the way they drink.

It may or may not be obvious that alcohol is causing a problem with your day-to-day life. There may also be some effects, which we accept as commonplace such as low mood after drinking and increased anxiety. Our research shows that a significant amount of people associate low mood as a symptom of drinking alcohol and said they regretted something they had said or did as a consequence of alcohol over the last 12 months.2

Changing your relationship with alcohol may be something you want to do but are not sure how to. You may have lots of different feelings and thoughts about making a change, but know that change is possible and that the HSE can support you. If you decide that alcohol is a niggling issue for you in your life, you might think about cutting down or giving it up. You could decide to do it on your own or with some support. If you need help, there are supports available. The HSE has advice to help you successfully change your relationship with alcohol.

Once you have decided to make a change, you can use a number of strategies to help you do so:

Make a plan – It’s normal to have doubts and mixed feelings about changing your habits. There may be times when you want to give in. Having a plan in writing will help you be clear about your reasons for changing and things that will help you succeed. Write down your top 5 reasons for making this change and keep them with you.

Goal setting – Decide what you want to achieve. You might want to drink less or stop drinking for health reasons or financial reasons.

Decide the rules – for example, controlled drinking means having strict rules about what you drink. For example only drinking once a week or not drinking more than 3 drinks at a time. Keeping an alcohol diary is a good way to help you stay on track. If you want to stop completely, pick a date soon that suits you best and prepare for it.

Seek support – If you decide not to do it on your own, there are many ways you can get some support. Call the Alcohol and Drugs Helpline on 1800 459 459, which is a free and confidential service. Opening hours are Monday to Friday, 9.30am and 5.30pm.

Learn from the past – You may have tried unsuccessfully to change the way you drink in the past. If so, think about what worked and what you could do differently this time.

Feel good about what you’re doing – Reward your successes. Do things that you enjoy that you may not have done for some time. Like rejoining a team sport or trying out a new hobby.

Plan for triggers – You may have certain times you associate with drinking excessively or more than you would like. These times could include after work, nights out with friends or special events. Some situations can trigger an urge to drink to excess. These could be when you have had an argument, are stressed, are feeling down, are finding it hard to sleep, need a break from everything. Try to think about how you will get through these moments, before they happen. This may mean changing your routine or finding new activities. It can also mean learning about better ways to deal with problems and cope with stress.

Marion Rackard says friends and family can play an important role:

“It can be helpful to tell people about your plans to cut back or give up completely. You might tell your friends or family that you’re trying to cut back or stop drinking altogether. They can encourage you and support you by not drinking around you or encouraging you to do so.

According to the Department of Health 2018 Healthy Ireland Survey, 8% of drinkers have failed to do what was normally expected from them in the past 12 months because of drinking.3 So it is valuable to learn how to say ‘no’ when you might be offered alcohol. You don’t have to give a reason.”

For people who drink more heavily or struggle with alcohol dependency trying to give up can be very difficult. If you need help with finding support, call the Alcohol and Drugs Helpline on 1800 459 459 or visit the Alcohol Support and Services page on www.AskAboutAlcohol.ie


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