Storm Jorge: Live Updates





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We’ve compiled a list of emergency numbers that you may need throughout #StormJorge. Be informed and stay safe!


29/02/2020: #StormJorge has been named by the Spanish Met Office (AEMET.) A status orange weather warning is currently in place, and is valid until 19:00 this evening. A status yellow weather warnings is in place from 7pm – midnight.




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Storm Dennis – Live Updates





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We’ve compiled a list of emergency numbers that you may need throughout #StormDennis. Be informed and stay safe!






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#StormCiara: Live Updates





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We’ve compiled a list of emergency numbers that you may need throughout #StormCiara. Be informed and stay safe!





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Christmas Forecast by Weather Alerts Ireland (Guest Post)





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🎄🎅Christmas Forecast for Cork 🎅🎄

🎅 Christmas Eve 🎅

Christmas Eve will start cold with temperatures just above freezing. Showers look to push in from the South West in the morning.
Then high pressure pushes into Ireland throughout the day and the showers die out leaving dry and sunny conditions in the afternoon.

🎁 Christmas Day 🎁

Christmas Day will begin cold with frost and ice expected as temperatures are expected to drop to -2 or -3 overnight.
The whole day should be dry with plenty of sunshine but staying cold.
Temperatures ranging from 5-7 degrees inland and 8-10 nearer the coasts.

🎄 St Stephens Day 🎄

Temperatures staying mild overnight as cloud builds and the chance of rain increases.
Heavy showers look to affect Cork throughout the day and temperatures will rise to 9-11 degrees throughout the days.

This is still subject to change as it is still 5 days away.

This was a guest post, written by Nick from Weather Alerts Ireland on behalf of Cork Safety Alerts.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/weatheralertsireland

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WeatherAlertsIreland

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Weekend Weather Outlook by Weather Alerts Ireland – Snow and Ice possible for parts of Cork





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We’ve decided to do something a little different, and allow a ‘Guest Post’ on our website. The following forecast comes from Nick over at Weather Alerts Ireland. Here’s the weather outlook for this weekend, with Snow and Ice possible in parts of Cork!

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Friday Night:

  • Polar Air is pushing over Ireland today making temperatures drop and making it feel colder. Temperatures overnight will drop down to around freezing to 3 degrees around the county.
  • Showers will push in overnight and some will turn wintry with a chance of snow for lower ground as well as higher ground.
  • Snow Accumulations possible over higher ground by morning.

Saturday:

  • Wintry showers continuing tomorrow, Saturday and becoming more persistent throughout the day and accumulations possible in many parts. This is because Saturdays temperatures will struggle to rise above 3-5 degrees.
  • Saturday night will again drop down to freezing and some parts dropping to -2 degrees. This will lead to icy patches and frost.

Sunday:

  • Sunday will be much of the same with scattered showers and some of these wintry especially on higher ground.
  • A bit warmer with temperatures in parts of Cork maybe reaching 7-8 near coasts and 4-5 inland.
  • Sunday night will be mostly dry with a sharp frost and icy conditions expected as temperatures will drop below freezing.
  • Windchill overnight Sunday will be down to around -4 making it feel so much colder.

 

Pics by wxcharts.com, meteociel.fr and weather.us



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Weather for the week ahead by Cork – All Things Weather – Tuesday 12th November





It’s certainly cold, that’s for sure! We’ve got the Weather Outlook for the week as provided to us by Cork – All Things Weather.

A cloudy and dry night in store tonight. For me it doesn’t feel as cold as the previous night but no doubt it is still cold. Temps will be as low as 3ºC feeling more like 1ºC.

Tomorrow is the beginning of the real cold feel from what I can see and as a note to my previous monthly forecast for December I am now in a quandary as the models are not really giving what we should get but the Jetstream is failing to recover by returning to a more northerly position and instead is continuing to be further South and any attempts to get back up fail but more on this later in the week.
Now back to tomorrow and as stated the beginning of what I think is going to be the real cold feel.

We will start off with showers in the morning and temps at 6ºC (3ºC feel) and as the morning progresses by midday I see the temps dropping to around 4ºC (1ºC feel) and any showers giving a sleety mix (18% chance) and a 5% risk of heavy downpours.
The afternoon sees a slight pickup with temp getting to 5ºC (1ºC) and showers continuing with a 32% rose of heavy downpours. Showers continuing through the evening and temps dropping back to 4ºC (0ºC) with a 12% sleet risk.

Wednesday night will see temps drop to 3ºC (-1ºC) Sleet risk 27%.

Real Cold feel is looking to land around Monday next with temps hovering around 0ºC (-2–C) in the first half of the day. Thankfully the second half should get above these temps.

A cloudy and dry night in store tonight. For me it doesn’t feel as cold as the previous night but no doubt it is still…

Posted by Cork – All Things Weather on Tuesday, November 12, 2019




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High pressure to dominate the weather as temperatures soar to low 20’s




High pressure will be centred near or over Ireland up until and including Saturday, bringing mostly dry, calm and settled conditions as the week progresses.

Tonight (Monday) will be dry and rather chilly with good clear spells. Mist and fog setting in later, especially across inland areas. Lowest temperatures will range from 3° to 7° degrees.

Tomorrow, Tuesday will see early morning mist and fog clearing on Tuesday to give a dry and fine day with spells of autumn sunshine. Highest temperatures will range 17°C to 19°C.

Met Éireann’s outlook for the rest of the week indicate that most of the days should bring long spells of autumn sunshine, with light breezes (increasing moderate southeasterly later in the week). However, cloud will spill into north and northwest areas at times with some patchy drizzle along northern coasts during Wednesday.

Temperatures will continue to improve day by day, ranging 17 to 20 degrees on Wednesday and 18 to 22 degrees on the days thereafter, possibly higher in some parts.

Chilly enough at night however, especially Tuesday and Wednesday after-dark when temperatures may drop to the low single figures locally. Some shallow mist and fog patches by night too.

Present indications suggest that the weather will turn more unsettled later this coming weekend and into next week.




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Weather outlook for the week ahead – Saturday 7th September 2019





Met Éireann have released the Storm Names for the 2019/2020 Storm Season. Did your name make the cut? Check it here.

A mixed bag of weather next week including heavy rain with possibly spot flooding. Temperatures ranging from 19°C to as low as 3°C overnight on Monday. We’ve got the official forecast from Met Éireann below.

Saturday 7th September

Staying dry across most areas with a mix of cloud and sunny spells, though a few light showers may occur too. Highest temperatures of 16 to 19 degrees Celsius, best values in the south, in mostly light northwest breezes.

Sunday 8th September

Sunday will bring rain and drizzle to Atlantic counties into the afternoon, turning heavier into the evening. Mildest, driest and brightest across the midlands and east with some sunny spells. Feeling rather mild and humid with highs of 16 to 19 degrees (best values in the east), in mostly light southwest breezes.

Wet overnight with persistent rain and spot flooding. Lowest temperatures 9 to 12 degrees Celsius, in mostly light southwest breezes.

Monday 9th September

Any lingering overnight rain across parts of the north and east will quickly clear. Sunny spells and scattered blustery showers will follow for the rest of the day, but a few of those will continue heavy in the north and east. Feeling fresh with highs of 14 to 17 degrees, in moderate to fresh northwest breezes.

Chilly and calm overnight with long clear spells; lows of 3 to 8 degrees Celsius.

Tuesday 10th September

A cool crisp start but staying dry for much of the day with long spells of autumn sunshine and light to moderate southwest breezes. Highest temperatures 15 to 17 degrees. However, rain will arrive into the west and northwest later in the afternoon moving in elsewhere later with very wet and windy weather after dark. Southwest winds will also freshen, increasing strong up along the Atlantic coast.

Very wet and breezy overnight with lows of 12 to 14 degrees Celsius.

Wednesday 11th September

A damp start after overnight rain with sunny spells and scattred blustery showers through the day. Highest temperatures 16 to 19 degrees Celsius, mildest across the east.


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The list of storm names for the 2019/2020 storm season have been released by Met Éireann




Met Éireann have published a list of the Storm Names, for the 2019/2020 storm season. Met Éireann and the UK Met Office, along with new storm naming partner KNMI (the Dutch National Weather Service) have unveiled the list of names.

Met Éireann say: 

First introduced by Met Éireann and the UK Met Office in 2015, the Name our Storms campaign has helped raise awareness of the threat and impact of severe weather in Ireland and Britain before it hits. Now in its fifth year, Met Éireann and the UK Met Office have been joined by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI).

A storm is named by a National Met Service when Orange or Red level winds are forecast to impact over a wide land area. Orange or Red level gusts can occur in exposed areas without the event being named.

Once a storm is named by any National Met Service globally, that name is retained if the storm moves into our waters. For example: Ophelia was named by the National Hurricane Center (USA) and Emma by IPMA (Portugal).

This summer Met Éireann and the UK Met Office received thousands of suggestions from the public following a call for people to send in ideas for future storm names. The three national met services then worked together to compile the suggested names and chose some of the most popular names along with names that reflect the three nations’ diversity.

Evelyn Cusack is Head of Forecasting at Met Éireann and is also Chair of the European Storm Naming Group:
‘The naming of storms by National Met Services as well as colour coding weather warnings provides a clear, authoritative and consistent message to the public and prompts people to take action to prevent harm to themselves or to their property.’

Evelyn added: ‘We are overwhelmed with the huge response to our public call for storm names and please don’t be too disappointed if your name hasn’t been used as you will get another chance next year.’

Gerard van der Steenhoven, Director General at Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI):
“We are looking forward to intensifying our collaboration with the UK Met Office and Met Éireann on storm forecasting. As storms are not confined to national borders, it makes a lot of sense to give common names to such extreme weather events. As many people are traveling – sometimes on a daily basis – between our countries, the use of common names will make it a lot easier for them to appreciate the hazards represented by a large storm system. For us at KNMI, it is a great privilege and advantage to work – from now on – in close co-operation with our colleagues from Ireland and the UK in the communication about storms.”

Eoin Moran, Director of Met Éireann:
“Met Éireann is delighted to collaborate with our colleagues in the UK Met Office and KNMI in this storm naming initiative.”

Derrick Ryall, Associate Director of Public Weather Service at the Met Office said:
“In addition to Met Office weather warnings, the storm naming scheme has been proved to raise awareness of severe weather in the UK, providing a consistent message to the public and crucially helping people to make better decisions so they can stay safe and thrive.”




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Weekend Weather Outlook – Thundery downpours and spot flooding expected

Image: Met Éireann



Met Éireann are forecasting heavy scattered showers today merging into longer spells rain through the day. Some thundery downpours could lead to spot flooding in places.

Temperatures of between 16°C to 19° degrees and very blustery with fresh and gusty southwesterly winds veering northerly by evening.

TONIGHT

  • The heavy showers or longer spells of rain will continue for a time tonight but drier conditions will develop towards dawn. Lowest temperatures of 11 or 12 degrees. Moderate west to northwest winds will be fresh to strong at times along coasts.

TOMORROW – SUNDAY 11TH AUGUST

  • Brighter and fresher tomorrow, Sunday. Showery rain will clear eastern parts of the province early on Sunday and drier conditions with isolated showers will move in from the west. Feeling cooler than recent days with highest temperatures of 16 to 18. Winds will be light to moderate northwesterly.



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